Tip 19: How to study tenses- III

Welcome to the series on how to study tenses. This is the last installment of the series intended to teach about studying the various perfect tenses.

Past perfect tense and Past Tense

The Past Perfect Tense should always be studied with Simple Past Tense. Understand that you will not need a past perfect tense unless there is another past action involved. For instance, you don’t need to say- I had gone to the market. You can simply say: I went to the market.

But note this: I told my wife that I had gone to the market. Here, you need the past perfect form (had gone) because there are two actions here- 1) Gone. 2) Told. The going to the market part happened before the telling his wife part. So the former must be in the past perfect tense. Take a look:

  • I wrote in my diary. (An action that happened in the past takes a Simple Past Tense)
  • I wrote in my diary about what songs I had sung that night. (Two actions happened in the past one of which happened before the other, hence, that previous action needs a Past Perfect Tense)

Present Perfect Tense

There are two basic uses of Present Perfect Tense:

  1. A recently finished action
  2. An action that happened in the past but still affects your present.

Take a look:

  • I have just returned home. (recently finished action)
  • I have seen the Taj Mahal. (happened in the past but still affects your present)

Future Perfect Tense

This tense has only one usage: any action that you are very sure will finish at a specific time in future. Examples-

  • I will have completed my degree by 2015.
  • She will have written the novel by that time.

However, you will have to remember the forms and helping verbs used in each of these tenses. One common thing among all the perfect tenses is that the verb is always used in the third form.

For more English basics, watch this space!

Tip 19: How to study tenses- III
Tip 19: How to study tenses- III - By : | Date Published : 28-01-2015 | Category : English Tips |
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Welcome to the series on how to study tenses. This

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